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Better access for buses as Greater Anglia upgrades Diss rail station car park

Diss rail station car park is set to be transformed with a new layout, upgraded features and integrated access for local bus services to serve the station, with a new exit to Nelson Road.

In partnership with Norfolk County Council, Greater Anglia is investing £900K to create the new features, a new bus stop and redesign the layout of the car park.

Although overall, the number of parking spaces will remain the same, the project will see the South Car park extended, an additional seven disabled parking bays provided, and five new electric vehicle charging points installed.

Additional safe walkways and additional lighting will also be added.

Two dilapidated mobile buildings have been removed to facilitate the project.

Greater Anglia’s Asset Management Director, Simone Bailey, said: “This large project will transform the whole car park, improving facilities for customers and providing integrated access and exit for buses serving the station.

“As Diss continues to grow, we are pleased to upgrade and improve the car park to encourage more sustainable journeys by rail.”

“Norfolk County Council’s Cabinet Member for Highways, infrastructure and transport, Graham Plant, said: “We’re working hard to provide Norfolk residents with as many options for green travel as possible: our Bus Service Improvement Plan has seen many new options put in place for bus travel, but rail is just as important for many.

“By improving the links between bus and rail travel at Diss, and by offering more electric vehicle charging points, Greater Anglia’s changes will give more people the chance to make rail their first choice of transport and to reduce their carbon emissions and their mileage too.”

The car park will stay open for the duration of the works and can be used as normal throughout.

The works are expected to be completed later in the autumn.

Photo credit: Greater Anglia

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